Sudan scuba diving Liveaboard

We are preparing our next season in SUDAN FOR 2014. We are planning 18 diving weeks. Our Sudan itineraries have been expanded with the one-of-a-kind true adventure 1-week and 2-week DEEP SOUTH TOUR and the exciting ULTIMATE SUDAN TOUR with the combination of North and South dive sites. And we still offer the traditional NORTH AND SOUTH TOURS from which to choose.

Take a luxury liveaboard with us and explore the most interesting dive sites of the Red Sea. Compare to the rest of the boats sailing in Sudan we have some additional benefits that are guaranteed to get the best services:

  • Dive Sites: Our itineraries include dive sites all the way from Angarosh and Abington in the north to as far as the most southern Sudanese site of Dahrat Ebid near the Eritrean border.
  • Unique itineraries: We are the only ones offering 1-week and 2-week tours in the Deep South of Sudan.
  • Diving: You can enjoy 3 day dives and a free night dive every day.
  • Safety: Ours are the only liveaboards (M/Y Cassiopeia and M/Y Andromeda) with a lost diver search and locate security system.
  • Speed: We are the fastest boats in the region, enabling us to reach the most remote sites.
  • Comfort: Our 100m2 sun deck is your ultimate escape to take it easy. 24h aircondition onboard.
  • Relaxation: We offer free delicious shisha onboard in our shisha room.
  • Fun: You can rent scooters onboard to make your dives even more exhilarating.
  • Boat: Our boat is made of steel, which is a necessary feature on the Sudanese Red Sea.
  • WIFI onboard M/Y Andromeda and M/Y Cassiopeia

Our newly designed sudan-diving.com Web page’s English version is operational! Click here if you have not seen it yet. Please e-mail us for booking information or availability: online@cassiopeiasafari.com

Our safari tours in Sudan:

Dive sites in the Sudanese Red Sea
Dive sites in the Sudanese Red Sea

Suakin

At the end of the diving safari tour there is a chance to visit Suakin, the ancient main port city in the Red Sea. Today gentle winds blow through the blindingly white walls and building remains that were made of coral “bricks”. It is easy to imagine the beautifully built houses with their mashrabeyas and the bustling city it used to be…

Thistlegorm

THE STORY OF THE SINKING:


thistlegorm2_HRIn May, 1941 the Thistlegorm was being loaded with war supplies in her home port of Glasgow. She was to carry huge amounts and a wide array of military cargo including land mines, shells, ammunition, weapons, trucks, armoured cars, motorcycles, trailers, vehicle and aircraft spare parts, radios, rubber boots and a whole lot more. There were also a couple of railway engines, tenders and water carriers for the Egyptian Railways. She joined a large convoy and headed for Alexandria.

The Axis Forces having occupied almost all of the northern Mediterranean coastline, the convoy followed the safer route to Alexandria which was via South Africa. After sailing north along Africa’s eastern coasts, the convoy arrived in the Red Sea.

When arriving at the entrance to the Gulf of Suez, Thistlegorm was assigned “safe anchorage” and was to wait for further information. They settled in to wait for clearance to proceed through the channel to Alexandria.

The length of wait was dependent on several factors such as aircraft activity, cargo priority and the time the vessels had been waiting already. Thanks to two vessels colliding in the gulf and virtually blocking the way through, Thistlegorm was forced to wait two weeks, standing idle.

German night-flying aircrafts were alerted to possible large-sized vessels in the Red Sea. On October 5, 1941 at about 11pm two aircrafts left their base in Crete and headed for the Egyptian coast. Their mission was to seek and destroy.

Just as their fuel levels were getting to a critical low and they thought their mission was fruitless, the Germans noticed a ship at anchor. One of the pilots dipped his plane low and approached the Thistlegorm, dropping his bombs right over the bridge. The bombs detonated the ammunition cargo and the explosion ripped the ship open.

The vessel began to sink quickly and the crew speedily abandoned the ship. The Thistlegorm sank at 1:30am on October 6, 1941. In all, 9 people lost their lives.

DIVING AT THE WRECK:

thistlegorm3The Thislegorm was initially discovered by the legendary Jacques-Yves Cousteau in 1956.  She sits on the seabed at 28m in an upright sailing position. The very top of the structure is only 12m from the water surface. She is one of the most sought-out wrecks in the world and with reason.

The holds are still laden with cargo. Divers can discover the tons of equipment such as jeeps, trucks, tires, motorcycles and alike and easily imagine the life onboard this awesome vessel. Around the vessel there also items that were ejected from the cargo hull following the tremendous explosion. There are tanks, towing equipment, boxed ammunition and weapons.

Access is easy through the blasted-out bridge area. The crumpled decking folding out as an open tin can is still as it had been after the explosion. The image tells of a devastating event. Vehicles are parked in the hold as if waiting to be unloaded. On the starboard side besides the vehicles, other items can be found like small arms and weapons. On the stern two deck-mounted guns are still in place and are best viewed from below.

Usually there is a current but it can get quite strong coming in from the north. Groupers, jackfish, tuna and the occasional black-tip shark are just a few of the larger marine life visiting this place. The usual reef fish and creatures are also present and provide a nice distraction from the wreck.

Caught between dolphins and sharks

We found ourselves caught between dolphins and sharks during our dives last week in Sudan. One excitement after the other, one dolphin after the other! If we were not diving, we were snorkelling or “scootering” among the dolphins in the turquoise waters of the lagoon at Shaab Rumi.

Tour date: April 13-20, 2013
Itinerary: Sudan-North
Air temperatures: 35C
Water temperatures: 27C
Visibility: 30m

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The weather was perfect, we were able to dive at all the sites in our North itinerary. We ran into hammerheads at Angarosh, Qita El Banna and Shaab Rumi too, where, not surprisingly, we met up with a school of 30 hammerhead sharks. To top it off, 4-5 bottlenose dolphins followed the zodiac and swam to us, while on out safety stop. It seems this was the week for dolphins and sharks because after the shark dives, we were able to snorkel with dolphins by the boat in the lagoon, not once but twice.

Our weekly video is full of action too. Click the picture to watch! With scooters among dolphins.

Day 1: Sanganeb West, Sangabeb West, Sanganeb West
Day 2: Angarosh, Angarosh, Merlo, Gota Shambaia
Day 3: Qita el Banna, Blue Belt, Precontinent, Precontinent
Day 4: Shaab Rumi, Shaab Rumi, Shaab Rumi észak, Shaab Rumi lagoon
Day 5: Shaab Rumi, Sanganeb South, Sanganeb South, Umbria
Day 6: Umbria, Umbria

A new week, new hopes. We will be back next week again and let you know what we will have seen.

In case you have missed out on our previous reports, you can catch up by following these links:

Scooters in action!
Sudan, the Jolly, under and above water
An Eiffel Tower in Sudan
Manta, hammerhead, barracuda!
The sharks winked back!
Angarosh, the “Mother of Sharks”
A perfect start in Sudan!
Fish parade in the month of the Pisces!